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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
Case Report
Commentary
Editorial
Erratum
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Original Article
Point of Technique
Review Article
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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
02 (
Suppl 1
); S108-S108
doi:
10.1055/s-0039-1685328

Ovary: Poster Abstract: Immature teratoma

Licence
This open access article is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Abstract

Introduction:

Immature teratoma represents 3% of all teratomas, 1 % of all ovarian cancers and 20% of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors. It is found either in pure form or as a component of a mixed germ cell tumor. It occurs essentially during the first two decades of life. According to WHO, immature teratoma is defined as a teratoma containing a variable amount of immature embryonal type neuroectodermal tissue

Case:

We present here a report of 23 years old unmarried female who presented with complaint of abdominal pain since 1 month and her CT scan done outside, showed fibroid uterus. She had history of typhoid fever 1 month back for which USG was done which suggested large uterine fibroid. On examination she was hemodynamically stable. On abdominal examination a non-tender supra-pubic mass of 24 weeks size with firm consistency, irregular margin was felt. On investigation CA 125 was 64.90 IU/L, LD- 223, beta HCG- 1.14. On MRI a large abdomino-pelvic lesion, likely left adnexal lesion with multiple cystic areas, with hemorrhage, with ascites and enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes with omental infiltration suggestive of a possibility of malignant germ cell tumor. In view of large ovarian tumor, possibly malignant decision for staging laparotomy was taken. Intra-operatively a large irregular vascular solid mass of 20 × 20 cms with bosselated appearance with few cystic lesions over it was seen, arising from left ovary and was sent for frozen section which reported malignant mature teratoma with components of immature teratoma. She underwent laparotomy with left salpingo-oophorectomy with right ovarian biopsy, omentectomy, appendectomy with B/L pelvic lymphadenectomy. Histopathology was suggestive of grade III immature teratoma. In view of grade III immature teratoma, she received chemotherapy (BEP regimen) post-operatively and is currently under follow up.

Conclusion:

This case reflects the importance of early diagnosis in cases of pelvic masses in young females. Fertility preservation should be considered in young women with germ cell tumors. Patients with grade II or III tumors or a mere advanced stage disease should be treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (BEP) in addition to surgery.


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