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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
02 (
Suppl 1
); S126-S126
doi:
10.1055/s-0039-1685408

Cervix: Poster Abstract: Cervical cancer management in Rural India: Are we really living in 21st century or need to focus on health education of our doctors

Paras Hospital, Gurgaon, Haryana, India
Licence
This open access article is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Abstract

Objectives:

To study cases of cervical cancer managed/unmanaged in rural India and to analyze the reasons for poor outcome.

Methods:

This is a retrospective study of 218 cases of cervical cancers between 2008-2013 with resultant outcome in terms of treatment or absence of treatment in spite of diagnosis. Reasons for not taking the treatment have been analyzed. Also, analysis of 21 cases of simple hysterectomy with resultant complications like VVF, RVF has been done. Indications of surgery, operating surgeon, availability of preoperative/postoperative HPR, slides/blocks, discharge summary and disease status at the time of referral was done.

Results:

44% refused to take treatment in spite of stage III diagnosis citing financial constraints, distance to be traveled daily for RT and apathetic attitude of family towards females. 20.65% opted for other hospitals. 29.8% took complete treatment. 80% of females were illiterate and dependent. 9.7% had simple hysterectomy for invasive disease. 95% of simple hysterectomies were performed by general surgeons in private setups resulting in 19% of complications like VVF, RVF. 100% cases of simple Hysterectomy did not have pre-operative biopsy. Only 50% cases had post-operative biopsy report and in none of the cases were slide/blocks available for review as trained pathologists were not available. General surgeons who had performed surgery were neither trained in doing P/V examinations nor aware of staging of cervical cancer.

Conclusion:

Illiteracy, poverty and absence of implementation of cancer control programs are the major hurdles in control of cervical cancer. The study highlights the absence of Government's will to control cervical cancer in rural India. It emphasizes on the need of intensive training and health education of gynaecologists and surgeons at district/rural level, lack of which is a primary factor for violation of medical ethics by the doctors.


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