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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
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Case Report
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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
Case Report
Commentary
Editorial
Erratum
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Original Article
Point of Technique
Review Article
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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
02 (
Suppl 1
); S92-S92
doi:
10.1055/s-0039-1685268

Cervix: Oral Abstract: IMRT in carcinoma cervix: Maximizing the gain and nipping the side effects: RGCI experience

Licence
This open access article is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Abstract

Objective:

To present a single institutional experience with acute toxicity, patterns of failure and survival in carcinoma cervix treated using definitive radiotherapy with IMRT technique.

Methods:

It is a retrospective analysis of 64 patients with carcinoma cervix treated with definitive chemoradiation (IMRT) from April 2011 to Jan 2013. Patients with squamous or adenocarcinoma histology and no metastasis, treated with definitive radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy were included. Acute toxicities were presented as proportions and kaplainmeier computation was done to calculate 3 years disease free survival (DFS) and 3 years overall survival (OS).

Results:

Median follow up was months for the entire cohort. Mean age was 55.9 years (SD 9.93). Majority of patients (92.8%) had locally advanced disease (FIGO II and III) and squamous cell carcinoma (96.9%). Mean dose to pelvis with IMRT was 49.75 Gy (SD 1.78) followed by ICRT, EBRT boost and implant in 79.7%, 17.2% and 3.1% respectively (as indicated). Response evaluation done at 3 months of treatment completion showed 83.6% complete response, 11.5% partial response and 4.9% progressive disease. During follow up 21.6% developed recurrence - 44.4% failed locally, 16.7% at para-aortic nodal region and 38.9% at distant sites. The 3 year DFS and OS was 70.8% and 60.3% respectively. Patients had tolerable acute toxicities. Incidences of grade ≥3 acute toxicity were 3.1% for anemia, 10.9% for neutropenia, 25% for thrombocytopenia, 1.5% for nausea, 0% for vomiting, 12% for GU and 12% for GI toxicities. Incidence of grade I, II and III radiation dermatitis were 38.89%, 27.78% and 22.2% respectively. None developed grade IV radiation dermatitis.

Conclusion:

IMRT for carcinoma cervix seems to provide improved outcomes and toxicity profile, although it should be compared with conventional radiotherapy in a well randomized control setting so as to have true and meaningful comparison.


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