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Case Report
Commentary
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Erratum
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Original Article
Point of Technique
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Abstracts - RGCON 2016
02 (
Suppl 1
); S113-S114
doi:
10.1055/s-0039-1685352

Miscellaneous: Oral Abstract: Retrospective analysis of acute and late gastrointestinal and hematological toxicities with extended field radiation in gynaecological malignancies: A single institution data

Department of Radiation Oncology, Max Cancer Center, Max Super Specialty Hospital, Saket, New Delhi, India
Licence
This open access article is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Abstract

Purpose:

The aim of this study is to report a preliminary analysis of our clinical experience with extended field pelvic (conformal) radiation, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, in gynaecological malignancies.

Materials and Methods:

27 women with gynaecological malignancies (17 with Carcinoma Cervix and 10 with Carcinoma Endometrium) were treated between November 2009 and October 2015 with Extended Field abdomino-pelvic radiation. All patients were treated with conformal radiation (Intensity Modulated Radiotherpy or Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy). All patients underwent CT Simulation followed by target and OAR delineation as per RTOG guidelines. Dose prescriped was 45-50 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction and boost to gross node upto 54-56 Gy. Planning was done on Eclipse Planning system, and treatment was delivered on 6 MV linac. Concurrent chemotherapy was given when indicated. All toxicities were scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v 4.03). Dosimetric parameters were correlated with toxicities.

Results:

Median follow up was 9.5 months (Range 0-52 months). 14 (51.8%) patients developed Grade 1 and 2 acute hematological toxicity and 1 (0.04%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. 10 (37%) patients developed Grade 1 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity and 1 (0.04%) developed grade 4 toxicity. 3 (11.12%) patients had late toxicity in the form of prolonged leucopenia, SAIO, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. 1 patient did not complete her treatment due to persistent leucopenia (Grade 3).

Conclusion:

Extended field Radiation in Gynaecological malignancies is a reasonably well tolerated procedure when treated with IMRT or VMAT, with acceptable toxicity profile.


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